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Yea, verily, I say unto you

JTB suggests a novel solution to BG’s problem. Draw upon the ranks of archaic time-honored, but neglected English! To wit, a handy list of qualifiers, transitions, and fillers (in no particular order) for ready use in whatever article, book manuscript, or dissertation you happen to be writing:

yea, verily, I say unto you
to wit
forsooth
forasmuch
now I would not have you ignorant, brethren
hitherto
wherefore
wherein
behold
chiefly
as it is written
there is none that understandeth
I say (as in, “To declare, I say, at this time…”)
God forbid!
peradventure
‘tis said

Surely your Chaucer, your King James Bible, your Shakespeare (Hamlet or Julius Caesar would be ideal)—even better, your Marlowe—will supply better treasures than these?

 

Comments

I used to use forsooth in my speach often, when I was 18. I haven’t, though, used it in years.

“Wherefore” is a personal favorite of mine.

henceforth gives academic writing both snazzy flair and assertiveness.

I promise to try to work in a “now I would not have you ignorant, brethren” into the dissertation. Somewhere. “God forbid!” would just be too easy…